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... common questions we've received. Read the latest updates News COVID-19 update Oranga Tamariki continues to operate duirng the pandemic and encourages people to contact us if worried about a child or young person. Find out more Youth justice insights - separating misconceptions from facts This report explores the youth justic...

Overview

... The Oranga Tamariki Way We’re introducing a new way of doing things. A way of looking at the world that guides everything we do:We put tamariki first We will challenge when things aren’t right for the child.We respect the mana of people We listen, we don’t assume, and we create solutions with others. We believe aroha is vital It keeps us focused on what is right.We value whakapapa Tamariki are part of a whānau and a community.We are tika and pono We do what we say we...

Our journey

... shortcomings of the system as it was under Child, Youth, and Family; including raising the age of care to 17, investment in early interventions, giving our partners confidence with greater use of long term funding, significantly reducing the time young people were spending in police cells after offending, ensuring more tamariki Māori in care were placed with whānau, and strengthening social work practice to start.Year two - building a new wayIn our second full year as a new Ministry in 2018/1...

Adopting overseas

... start is to contact one of our adoption social workers. They will answer any initial questions you have and tell you when the next group information session is in your area. At the session you’ll get an overview of the general adoption process and meet people who can answer your questions. You can also get an application form.Applying to adopt overseasOnce you’ve decided you’d like to adopt, complete an application form, giving basic information about yourself. You specify which country y...

What happens first?

... assessment If we're worried that a child's wellbeing could be at risk, we undertake an assessment to find out more about what's happening.One of our social workers will visit the child, their family or caregiver. They will also talk to people connected with the family or whānau, to find out more about the situation. We then make a decision about what to do next.In some situations – where the concerns are serious and may constitute a criminal offence – we work in partne...

Working with others

... whānau, hapū and iwi.  Other partners and providers We work closely with other partner agencies and providers to ensure we meet the needs of children and young people. These range from organisations and government agencies such as Police, the Ministry of Health, NGOs, to community groups, local bodies and businesses – we all have a part to play....